Home Entertainment Chennai theatres welcome print projection, set to display screen Tamil re-releases

Chennai theatres welcome print projection, set to display screen Tamil re-releases

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Chennai theatres welcome print projection, set to display screen Tamil re-releases

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S Kamalakannan, theatre operator at GK Cinemas in Porur, Chennai

S Kamalakannan, theatre operator at GK Cinemas in Porur, Chennai
| Picture Credit score: S Shiva Raj

Ajith will woo Simran, and Vijay will sing a tune for Richa Pallod. This March, it’s time to return in time and revisit some memorable previous Tamil movies on the large display screen.

At Chennai’s GK Cinemas, March is thrilling due to a number of causes. However a model new launch just isn’t one in all them.

“With exams across the nook, this has historically been a nasty month for cinema, and thus, we often have re-releases that fetch us footfall,” explains Ruban Mathivanan of GK Cinemas. This time, nevertheless, he has cause to rejoice: not solely will he showcase a particular playback sequence, however he has additionally enabled his foremost display screen with a print projector, thus bringing again to theatres a know-how that has not been in vogue within the final decade or so. “I used to be fortunate that my father had saved the previous projectors fastidiously. However we needed to put in quite a lot of effort and time in getting it in form as discovering spare components was powerful.”

On the forefront of this playback sequence at GK Cinemas is S Kamalakannan, who has been its theatre operator for the final 12 years. Kamalakannan has been a part of numerous theatre projector rooms since 1984 and has seen the winds of change. “It’s good to deal with a machine I’ve dealt with once I was a lot youthful,” says Kamalakannan, whilst he feeds in a movie reel into it, “I’m trying ahead to seeing how right this moment’s audiences react to the print and sound high quality of those movies.”

Ruban Mathivanan of GK Cinemas

Ruban Mathivanan of GK Cinemas
| Picture Credit score:
S Shiva Raj

After a yr of engaged on it, Ruban is able to showcase movies on it. He hopes to play Minsara Kanavu, the 1997 movie starring Aravind Swami, Kajol and Prabhu Deva, and Ajith-starrer Kaadhal Mannan, amongst others. “I’m additionally attempting to supply a print of Lesa Lesa,” he says.

With tickets priced at ₹80, these re-releases hope to evoke nostalgia amongst older audiences and supply a brand new expertise for youthful audiences who’re used to consuming movies performed by digital projectors.

The re-releases trend has clicked big-time amongst followers of Tamil cinema, who caught up with the discharge of movies reminiscent of 3, Aalavandan, Baba and Vaaranam Aayiram, amongst others. Nevertheless, it’s a “passing fad”, as Ruban factors out. “The number of movies is significant. When you observe fastidiously, it’s movies reminiscent of 3 and Vaaranam Aayiram which have accomplished exceedingly properly – and that’s due to chartbuster songs in them.”

Elsewhere in Chennai, Vadapalani’s Kamala Cinemas can also be gearing as much as dish out some nostalgia to Tamil cinema followers. They’ve revived print projection as properly, and hope to fulfil the requests of audiences who’re wanting to catch just a few classics on the large display screen.

Followers of cinema are trying ahead to those sweeping modifications in theatres, that are already grappling with a number of points owing to the dearth of huge movies, rising prices and entry of OTT platforms. The day a re-release equals the footfall of a brand new launch just isn’t too far, in line with some theatre house owners. Says Ruban, “If I get to display screen Rajinikanth’s Padayappa or Kamal Haasan’s Kuruthipunal, I’m certain they are going to give new releases a run for his or her cash.



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